Dispatches

Unintended effects of data privacy in healthcare

I would like to draw attention to an instance where I believe the pendulum has swung too far: the Healthcare Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)

Read More

R v Python: Dawn of Analytics

A fresh yet slightly biased perspective on the recent data science language war.

Read More

The State of Soccer

Can soccer be the new Budweiser?

Read More

The ultimate book about folktales

I’d like to use my first blog post to advertise the ultimate story book – which also happens to be one of the most successful works of information-based science: the Aarne-Thompson index. Briefly, this index tries nothing less than to identify and categorize every folklore tale. Although the first version of the index is more than a hundred years old, it has stayed as a useful tool for folklore research ever since. Parts of the success of the Aarne-Thompson index seem to stem from time-less design decisions for organizing data.

Read More

Environment issue in my hometown

At the end of each day of work, I look up at the vivid blue sky and smell the aroma of the many beautiful flowers as I make my way back to my apartment. Every weekend, I wander around the shore of Lake Michigan and feel the fresh breeze blowing across the lake. I believe that the pleasant natural environment, such as the green plants, the blue sky and lake, and chirping birds, is always the best stress reliever for me. However, whenever I am enjoying these gifts of nature, one question nags at my mind: What has happened to the environment in my hometown during the last 20 years?

Read More

Toward a Social Contract in Data Journalism

In the ongoing saga of American politics, we the voters have seen some pretty improbable things this election cycle. But to many, the starkest instance of the improbable has been Donald Trump’s rise to presumptive nominee for the GOP. But I won’t be talking about the situation in question – instead I want to discuss the state of data journalism in the wake of this campaign season.

Read More

The Impact of Brazil's Crises on Science

Brazil spends about 1% of its GDP on research and development, an amount far below what other countries of similar means invest into science. The economic and political crises has made things even worse for science. Recently, the government proposed several cuts that directly affect the future of research in Brazil.

Read More

The foreCite Index

Check out the foreCite Index, a new bibliometric indicator built from a rigorous framework of the statistics of citations.

Read More

Come to Nicolás Peláez's Public Thesis Presentation on March 11th

Nicolás “Fly-Eye” Peláez clocks up another win for science.

Read More

Peter Winter awarded PhD

Bystanders were left in awe.

Read More

The Problem with Intuition

Today I want to talk about quantum entanglement. No, not the details but the idea of entanglement and how it, and other radical ideas like it, can challenge our intuition.

Read More

No tienes...

Yesterday, the day before Thanksgiving break, was a really quiet morning. I could write about thanksgiving, something about the Spanish perspective, but we had a funny afternoon and I prefer to talk about it. We had lunch around noon and we talked about our annual “Trivia Tournament”. The rules are simple: each of us writes at least five questions; a “referee” mixes the questions into a single PowerPoint and hides the answers. During the tournament, the referee presents the questions and scores the players: one positive if the answer is correct, one negative if the answer is incorrect. There are three winners: who has the most positive points, the most negative points, and the most total points (positive plus negative points).

Read More

A Loss in Geek Life: The Death of the Midnight Premiere

I draped my Hunger Games blanket across my shoulders and proudly strode to the movie theaters, anxious to get in line. Except, there was no line.

Read More

Computer Models in History: Soviet Political Realism

Stepping into a slightly different pool than usual, let’s look at something from history: VRYAN (Russian acronym for Surprise Nuclear Missile Attack)

Read More

Scientific Utopias: Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the h-index

tl;drThe h-index isn’t boiling a person down into a single number, we are. Also, people in power are the worst and will act as such even if they’re scientists

Read More

Displacing the Classifieds

What is the most impactful invention of all time? Before some hipster’s smug intervention on behalf of the printing press, most millennials would nominate the internet. It’s difficult to argue that Google, Paypal, Amazon, Uber, Facebook, and Reddit haven’t profoundly altered our daily routines. While one-click ordering the one-hour delivery ...

Read More

A Man Walks into a Bar: A Computational Scientist’s Nightmare

There’s the old joke: “A man walks into a bar. He says ‘ow’ “.

Read More

The college scorecard

Health and education should be free. Or this is what most Europeans and a large group of Americans think. In an indirect attempt to decrease the currently rapidly increasing cost of college tuition, the US Department of Education has published a college scorecard in which the tuition cost, the salary after graduation, and the graduation rate are made available, among other information.

Read More

Welcome to New York, it's been waiting for you

Everybody here wanted something moreSearching for a sound we hadn’t heard before And it saidWelcome to New York, It’s been waiting for you

Read More

Follow me on the Reading Rainbow

Over the summer I’ve been able to successfully chisel away at my goal of reading 20 books by 16 different authors in 2015, with my two weeks of travel to and around Spain providing me ample time to dive into my iPad and digest. For this tour, I went back ...

Read More